Cinema School

soupsoup:

Steven Spielberg and Brian Grazer talk to Ron Howard and Jon Favreau about squatting their way to success. (via @missuku)

aconversationoncool:

“If it can be written, or thought, it can be filmed.” ~Stanley Kubrick

aconversationoncool:

“If it can be written, or thought, it can be filmed.” ~Stanley Kubrick

graydongordian:

bohemea:

The dark and cold weigh down everything, and in the middle, in their warm cocoon, are Chief Marge and her hubby, Norm, the painter of ducks. Without them, Fargo might have been In Cold Blood laced with unseemly humor. The Coens sometimes seem to scorn their characters, but their love for Marge redeems Fargo. Marge is the catalyst, and her speech at the end is Shakespearean in the way it heals wounds and restores order: “There’s more to life than a little money, you know. Don’t you know that? And here you are. And it’s a beautiful day.”
- Roger Ebert on Fargo

“Oh for Pete’s sake, he’s fleeing the interview! He’s fleeing the interview!”

graydongordian:

bohemea:

The dark and cold weigh down everything, and in the middle, in their warm cocoon, are Chief Marge and her hubby, Norm, the painter of ducks. Without them, Fargo might have been In Cold Blood laced with unseemly humor. The Coens sometimes seem to scorn their characters, but their love for Marge redeems Fargo. Marge is the catalyst, and her speech at the end is Shakespearean in the way it heals wounds and restores order: “There’s more to life than a little money, you know. Don’t you know that? And here you are. And it’s a beautiful day.”

- Roger Ebert on Fargo

Oh for Pete’s sake, he’s fleeing the interview! He’s fleeing the interview!”

directingfilm:

Stories are simple.  Don’t make them difficult.  Kurt Vonnegut graphs the shapes of stories to help us along the way.

(via Martin Scorsese On Vision In Hollywood | Fast Company)

fastcompany:

Three-time Oscar winner and current nominee Thelma Schoonmaker, who has edited every Martin Scorsese film since Raging Bull, dissects a sequence in Hugo that prompts her to recall the process of cutting Joe Pesci’s “Funny, how?” scene in 1990’s Goodfellas. Continued —>

directingfilm:

Nine-tenths of our movements obey habit and automatism. It is anti-nature to subordinate them to will and to thought.
~ Robert Bresson Notes sur le Cinématographe
Authentic performances come from habit.  This is the power of method acting.  You live as the character to such an extent that you take on their habits.  Their unconscious posture.  When they squint.  When they crack their knuckles.  It’s not about minutia.  It’s about habit.  Once you start thinking about your performance, you are no longer working in habit.  
A director must realize this and help facilitate it.
~ü
[Image: Robert De Niro in Taxi Driver]

directingfilm:

Nine-tenths of our movements obey habit and automatism. It is anti-nature to subordinate them to will and to thought.

~ Robert Bresson Notes sur le Cinématographe

Authentic performances come from habit.  This is the power of method acting.  You live as the character to such an extent that you take on their habits.  Their unconscious posture.  When they squint.  When they crack their knuckles.  It’s not about minutia.  It’s about habit.  Once you start thinking about your performance, you are no longer working in habit.  

A director must realize this and help facilitate it.

[Image: Robert De Niro in Taxi Driver]

We also need an insurgency of theater owners, distributors, marketers, and moviegoers. Yes, the film business is in flux, caught between dwindling box office and fledgling alternative distribution platforms, but maybe it’s time for the biz to start taking notes from the art. Throw away the boxes, stop pretending there are rules, take some risks. Stop worrying over what documentaries should be, and instead find ways to champion what they can be. Stop treating them like the veggies when they’ve become the main course.

Eric Hynes (via this Slate article)

Of the more than 800 feature films released theatrically in America last year, more than 300 were documentaries. (At premiere marketplace festivals like Sundance and Toronto, the ratio is similar.) Yet at the Academy Awards, where the film industry lavishly celebrates itself, all of those films compete for one measly award: best documentary. By comparison, dramatic features get 20 chances for an Oscar. While it’s technically possible (and eminently justifiable) for documentaries to receive nods for technical categories like editing, cinematography, and sound, in practice it hardly ever happens. And in 84 years, no documentary has even been nominated for best picture.

Great read on the attention documentaries don’t receive, and why.

(via futurejournalismproject)

coolcatteacher:

Charlie Chaplin was an icon of the silent film era. 

brianparis:

Canon EOS C300 = Awesome

Not sure I love the camera, but I love the video. This is the first video that makes me want to look at the camera. Too bad Canon doesn’t have a sense of humor.